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KNPS STUDENT RESEARCH GRANTS

KNPS is pleased to announce the student research grant program, a funding source to support botanical knowledge and understanding in Kentucky. We are pleased to offer awards of $500 for graduate student projects, and $250 for undergraduate projects. Awards will be given for field-based botanical project(s) which contribute to the knowledge of Kentucky's flora or natural communities (with students preferably attend-ing a Kentucky college or university). The grant may be used to purchase consumable supplies and materials such as rebar, herbarium paper, label stock, and topographic maps. The grant may also be used to cover travel expenses. It may not be used to pay time (e.g., labor) for any party.

Applications are due by the March 15, 2017. Applications will be evaluated and recipients will be announced at the 2017 Wildflower Weekend. Funding amount may vary depending on the applicant pool (and may include no grants given). Proposals will be reviewed by the KNPS Grant Committee.

Proposals must include:
1. A current resume/curriculum vitae;
2. A proposal (not to exceed two single-spaced typed pages) identifying the research as either graduate or undergraduate, and describing the proposed research and the role the grant would play in the research;
3. An itemized budget;
4. One letter of recommendation from a faculty member.

Applicants are encouraged to become members of the KNPS, but membership is not required to be awarded a grant. Grant recipients are required to provide KNPS with a short summary of the funded research suitable for publishing in KNPS's newsletter, The Lady-Slipper, within one year of receiving the grant. Grant recipients are also expected to present their work at the KNPS Fall or Spring meeting, and we encourage pre-senting their work at the annual Kentucky Academy of Sciences meeting within one year of completion of their research.
Submit electronic copies (as Word or PDF attachments) of all items listed above including letter of recommendation (sent separately by faculty member) to: dtaylor02@fs.fed.us


Recent KNPS Research Grant Recipients

Victoria Gilkison

Ms. Victoria (Torey) Gilkison is the winner of the 2012 undergraduate research award. She is currently a junior at Western Kentucky University in the Biology program. In the last 3 years she has presented six papers or posters with topics ranging from American Ginseng Conservation to Stable Isotope Analysis of the Upper Green River in Hart County, Kentucky. She has received research presentation awards in each of the last two years from WKU. Ms. Gilkison submitted a grant proposal entitled, Comparisons of Genetic Diversity among Disjunct Populations of Magnolia tripetala, to KNPS. Her research intends to investigate genetic diversity and look gene flow among core and outlying populations of umbrella magnolia. She expects that this work will help answer questions related to the conservation of outlying populations of this and other species.

James Shaffer

Mr. James Shaffer is the winner of the 2012 graduate research award. He is currently working on his Masters degree at the University of Kentucky. In his academic career, Mr. Shaffer has researched water use by chestnut oak and sassafras, comparing plants in clearcuts with those in secondary forests to mortality of redbay by the laurel wilt fungus. He is a member of the Omicron Delta Kappa honor society and has received numerous assistantships and research grants. Mr. Shaffer submitted a grant proposal entitled, The Influence of Grass Competition and Herbivory on Native Hardwood Seedling Establishment in the Inner Bluegrass of Kentucky, to KNPS. His research, currently on-going, is investigating the role of herbivory and grass competition on the establishment and composition of Bluegrass Savanna communities. The research is expected to provide insight to future establishment and maintenance of these communities.

Todd Rounsaville

Mr. Rounsaville is a winner of the 2013 graduate research award. He is currently working on his PhD degree at the University of Kentucky. In his career, Mr. Rounsaville has studied horticulture, looking at fertility and reproductive pathways of the invasive grass Miscanthus sinensis, and the ploidy levels and genomic size of Berberis and Mahonia. He has received numerous awards and scholarships. He is currently the native plants curator at the UK Arboretum and has served on the Advisory Board of Raven Run Nature Sanctuary, and the Central Kentucky Ornamental and Turf Association. Mr. Rounsaville submitted a grant proposal entitled Trends in plant-soil pairwise feedback between Elymus villosus, a native c3 grass, and Euonymus fortunei, an exotic invasive liana, to KNPS. His research is designed to help land managers develop effective controls for Euonymus fortunei.

Alexi Dart-Padover

Mr. Dart-Padover is a winner of the 2013 graduate research award. He is currently working on his Master’s degree at Eastern Kentucky University. In his career, Mr. Dart-Padover has worked to eradicate non-native invasive species, moniterd threatened shorebird populations in Florida and worked with bird studies in Peru.  He submitted a grant proposal entitled,
 A Comparison of Management Strategies for the Federally Endangered Running Buffalo Clover (Trifolium stoloniferum) in the Blue Grass Army Depot, KY, to KNPS. His research is designed to develop management techniques and pathways to help recover running buffalo clover.

Heidi Braunreiter

Ms. Braunreiter is a winner of the 2014 graduate research award. She is currently working her Master’s degree at Eastern Kentucky University. She has received a number of grants and awards and has had experience collecting fire effects monitoring data for the Wayne National Forest. She submitted a grant proposal entitled, A Vascular Flora of Boyle County, Kentucky, to KNPS. Ms. Braunreiter will be using herbarium specimens collected during field work to document the flora of Boyle County.

Pavan Podapati

Mr. Podapati is a winner of the 2014 graduate research award. He is currently working on his Master’s degree at the University of Kentucky.  In his career he has volunteered at several Kentucky nature preserves and worked as an intern for KSNPC. Mr. Podapati submitted a grant proposal entitled  The impacts of Imazapic on Garlic Mustard and non-target Forest Floor Vegetation in Central Kentucky’s Hardwood Forests to KNPS.  His research is investigation the use of imazapic for dormant season control of garlic mustard. There is hope that imazapic could be used to treat garlic mustard at a time when native forest floor vegetation is not likely to be affected.

Glen Kalisz

Mr. Kalisz is a winner of the Fall 2015 graduate research award. He is currently working on his Master’s degree at Eastern Kentucky University. He in his career worked as a research assistant for bobcat telemetry and forest vegetation sampling studies. Mr. Kalisz has received a number of awards and scholarships. He submitted a grant proposal entitled, Oak-Hickory Forest Regeneration Differences between a Harvested and an Unharvested Watershed in the Knobs Region of Central Kentucky to KNPS. His work should help shed light on a problem land managers and private land owners face when logging: how to encourage oak/hickory regeneration and discourage regeneration of red maple.

Matthew Savage

Mr. Savage is a winner of the Fall 2015 graduate research award. His currently working on his Master’s degree at the University of Kentucky.  He has in his career helped build a house, and served a group leader for a YCC team and a marking crew at the White River National Wildlife Refuge (AR). He has received a number of awards. Mr. Savage submitted a grant proposal entitled, Alterations in the Coleopteran Community in Response to Rapid and Widespread Mortality Caused by the Highly Invasive Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae, EAB),,in Invaded Forests of North-central Kentucky to KNPS.  He is expecting to shed light on how beetle communities change in response to catastrophic changes to forest communities. He will also be tracking the fate of ash regeneration.